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driving

Top Cars for Seniors

Senior citizens are often a forgotten consumer groups in automotive industry, yet one with great investment potential. Their needs are specific and so will be the models categorized for them. We bring you a list of top cars for senior citizens that can fulfill their needs and offer right kind of support they deserve.

Hyundai Sonata – One of the best car options for senior citizens, it is pleasant to pockets, spacious, comfortable, and with relatively simpler controls. Equipped with a 2.4-litre engine it delivers a fuel economy of 29mpg. Its’ pricing starts from $22, 000.

Volvo S80 – In case, your grandparents have a taste for some extra style and charm, Volvo S80 is the perfect option that will even fit their bills. The Swedish car has earned high scores for its safety features and comes with a bundle of hi-tech assets.

Subaru Forester – In case the elder members of your family are adventurous or like to travel with complete family, than this is the car for them. Subaru Forester is one of the best cars for old drivers owing to its reliability, safety features, affordability, and large cargo space.

Honda Fit – A little hatchback with large cargo space, outstanding performance, and inspiring fuel economy. It mileage figure stands at 33mpg and is also available with 6-speed manual transmission.

Read more here.

Car and Driver Reveals 10 Best Cars of 2016

It’s that time of year. Time to take a look at Car and Driver’s 10Best.

10Best involves more than drawing up lists of their sub-$80,000 favorites. Every year they enter their weeklong evalu­ation looking for new and improved combinations of virtues: value and engagement, performance and poise, sights and sounds, soul and character.

The cars that earn this award do more than merely succeed on one or two criteria; they come  fully formed, polished, complete. But how do they get that way? This year they delve deeper into their winners’ makings to better explain why they won.

Who builds and develops these cars? Where? How do they go about it? What is a 10Bester truly made of? There are, of course, varied answers because cars are not simple things.

You do not buy them on Etsy, and they’re not running a Maker Faire here. Automobiles are still the most complex and technologically advanced consumer products that man has ever devised.

Find out which cars are on their top 10 list for 2016.

Where Does The Insurance Liability Fall When It Comes To Autonomous Driving

 

After several incidents with autonomous driving and cars being hacked and taken over, a more dangerous side of the new technology appears.

Hacker attacks or faulty software could shift the burden of legal and regulatory liability toward makers of self-driving cars and away from customers, experts say, forcing regulators and insurers to develop new models.

Autonomous cars have the potential to reduce the rate of traffic accidents as sensors and software give a car faster and better reflexes to prevent a collision. However, a greater level of automation increases the need for cyber security and sophisticated software, experts said.

“Although accident rates will theoretically fall, new risks will come with autonomous vehicles,” said Domenico Savarese, Group head of Proposition Development and Telematics at Zurich Insurance.

“What should be done in the case of a faulty software algorithm? Should manufacturers be required to monitor vehicles post-sale in the case of a malfunction or a hacker attack?” Savarese asked.

While established models for assigning liability – such as holding the owner responsible for what the car does – will still be relevant, the onus may shift toward manufacturers.

Greater automation may also change consumer behavior and affect insurance costs if drivers become less vigilant and less practiced in their ability to avert an accident.

To Read More Click Here

 

  Improvements in Driving Done By Entrepreneurs

 

Startup companies think they can change driving. Here’s how.

A veteran computer scientist hates sitting in his car at stoplights, so he creates software that makes the experience less annoying. A former engineering professor wants to double the range of today’s electric vehicles. And an aeronautics expert believes flying cars shouldn’t be science fiction.

It’s no secret that technology is changing the car industry. The major automakers, as well as tech giants such as Google and possibly Apple, are laying the groundwork for the first driverless cars.

Meanwhile, a number of engineers and entrepreneurs have started their own companies to tackle other automotive challenges. Here are six startups that want to change the way you drive:

CONNECTED SIGNALS

Traffic lights bring order to intersections, but have their inconveniences: They turn red when you’re in a hurry; they take forever to change green. And then your mind wanders while you wait — until the guy behind you starts leaning on his horn.

Entrepreneur and computer scientist Matt Ginsberg hates red lights. So he started Connected Signals, based in Eugene, Oregon, to collect real-time data from cities that synchronize their traffic signals. The company’s smartphone app tells motorists if an upcoming signal is about to change color. It shows drivers how long they’ll have to wait if a light is red — and chimes a warning just before it turns green.

To Read More Click Here 

Pros and Cons of Autonomous Cars

While autonomous cars are expected to bring many benefits to drivers, there are also some drawbacks to consider.

Just as Wired magazine published a headline-grabbing story about hackers taking control of a new Jeep Cherokee with UConnect, engineers, computer programmers, professors, and lawyers were meeting in Ypsilanti, Michigan, to discuss evolution of the autonomous, connected automobile.

The Automated Vehicle Symposium is held every year by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB), and so it measures advances in these technologies in increments. Questions and concerns about security, ethics, and who’s responsible for the first crash caused by an autonomous car are not new for this group.

This year’s AVS followed the University of Michigan’s grand opening of its Mcity autonomous vehicle test track, where some of the suppliers and automakers participating in the symposium gave demonstrations of their latest technologies. I stayed indoors and listened to presentations. While there were no revelations, there were some interesting ideas that give clear indications where the automobile industry and our transportation system are heading. Herewith, a few tidbits:

The University of Michigan is extending its three-year-old testing of smart cars on public roads into an “entire system of connected roads,” entailing some of the major roads between metro Detroit and Ann Arbor, according to John Maddox, assistant director for the U-M Mobility Transformation Center (MTC). It could rival Google’s autonomous car-testing efforts in Silicon Valley and adds the element of ice- and snow-covered roads, which semi-automated cars can’t handle very well so far.

The MTC essentially is an extension of the university’s test of smart car technology that began on public roads in 2012, with a $100 million budget funded by automakers and suppliers, state and federal governments, and the university.

Read more here.